Roswell Conspiracy Part 1

On 7 July 1947 a rancher in New Mexico reported the discovery of a strange flying saucer that had crash landed in the desert 40 miles north of the small Air Force town of Roswell.
With its strange markings and unusual design, the find soon sparked a furious debate about where the bizarre craft could have come from.
The summer of 1947 had seen dozens of UFO sightings over Roswell.
Locals reported blinking lights, hovering discs and oddly-shaped aircraft in the clear night skies.
So when the Air Force issued a press release saying that a flying disc had been found, the rumour mill went into overdrive.
To those convinced that we are not alone in the universe, Roswell was the defining moment that saw years of UFO sightings and alien encounters backed up with cold, hard evidence.
But the UFO theory was quickly dispelled by military officials, who claimed the object they had recovered was a humble weather balloon, and for more than 30 years the eyes of the world turned away from the New Mexico desert.
Then, in 1980, retired Major Jesse Marcel, who had been involved in the recovery of the craft, told the National Enquirer that the military had covered-up the discovery of an alien spaceship at Roswell.
Since that interview the incident has gained legendary status in the conspiracy community,
For millions across the globe, it is the strongest proof yet that the US government has concealed the existence of aliens for more than 60 years. The American military continues to refute the claims of UFO enthusiasts, and intelligence chiefs have stuck to their “weather balloon” story since 1947.
So have we all been duped by a government cover-up to convince the public that little green men and flying saucers are make believe, or is Roswell just another UFO hoax?

Conspiracy Theories

What is a conspiracy theory?

To believe a conspiracy theory is to believe the ultimate cause of an event or a chain of events and/or the concealment of such (ranging from public knowledge to a secret and often deceptive plot) is performed by a powerful or influential people or organizations. Therefore, the majority of conspiracy theories imply that major events in history have been dominated by conspirators, people or organizations who manipulate events behind the scenes.

The etymology of “conspiracy” is Middle English conspiracie, from Latin conspirare, and means it is the act of conspiring together; an agreement among conspirators. Conspiracy means “an agreement between two or more persons to commit an unlawful act to accomplish a lawful end by unlawful means” (Britannica Concise Encyclopedia).

Discussion

There are a few reasons why people choose to believe in conspiracy theories, one is it gives one the sense of satisfaction of being smart enough to have figured it all out.  The problem however is what is occurring in reality, these theories are projecting their fictional musings onto real-life people, events, families, organizations, groups, etc. So, these theories are sold as politics, similar to the polemic of Adolf  Hitler, he was a master of weaving conspiracy tales. We see this throughout history taking for example Nero who blamed the Christians for burning Rome or even in the New Testament how the leaders devised a conspiracy theory to explain away the empty tomb (disciples carried him away).

These tales inflame the fears and paranoia of people to the extent that anything can happen taking for example World War 1 and 2 that took place back in the mid-twentieth century. In fact, people even get a sort of perverse enjoyment from retelling the tales of paranoia, supposed “insight,” fear, discontentment, etc which this propaganda promotes.